17th LRS commander takes first at powerlifting competition

DALLAS, Texas - Lt. Col. Michael Jones, 17th Logistics Readiness Squadron Commander poses with his son Tony after winning first place in the "pure," meaning lifetime steroid free category, and the over age 40 category, at the Natural Athlete Strength Association sponsored Powerlifting Championship, March 10. (Courtesy Photo)

DALLAS, Texas - Lt. Col. Michael Jones, 17th Logistics Readiness Squadron Commander poses with his son Tony after winning first place in the "pure," meaning lifetime steroid free category, and the over age 40 category, at the Natural Athlete Strength Association sponsored Powerlifting Championship, March 10. (Courtesy Photo)

DALLAS, Texas -- The 17th Logistics Readiness Squadron commander, competed in the Natural Athlete Strength Association sponsored Powerlifting Championship, March 10.

Jones won first place in the "pure," meaning lifetime steroid free category, and the over age 40 category, where he competed against eight individuals.

His interest in being a competitive powerlifter began when an acquaintance opened his mind up to the idea.

Jones said he always enjoyed working out hard and lifting heavy but never considered competing in a powerlifting event until his acquaintance asked him why not.

Out of curiosity, Jones began looking up powerlifting statistics and realized he was not far from competitive status.

In 2002, Jones competed in his first powerlifting meet in St. Louis, Mo., then went on to compete in the Military Worlds at Fort Hood in 2003.

Despite a back injury he experienced from the Military Worlds, Jones remained dedicated to the powerlifting sport, recovered and competed in the US Army in Europe Championship in Heidelberg, Germany.

After the European Championship, Jones won overall at the Oklahoma State Championships in Altus, Oklahoma, in 2007.

Jones began intensive training six months before the competition. Pre-competition training entailed workouts three to four times a week, concentrating on maximizing strength gains on the exercises to be judged; bench press, squat and deadlift.

Jones also incorporated some recruitment muscle training to ensure all the muscles involved in such lifts were as strong as possible.

"I am extremely grateful to Justin Young, Goodfellow personal trainer, who helped encourage me throughout the journey," Jones said.

Young attended the championship helping Jones with his gear before each lift. He also acted as Jones' spotter.

"This was the first competition where I chose to lose weight, making contest preparation especially difficult," Jones said.

He chose to compete in the 166 to 181 pound weight division. Jones said he was nervous when he weighed in on his own the night before at 181.2 pounds.

Nonetheless, his determination helped him eat and drink just enough to make his weight class the next day at the official weigh in.

The drive to do better than the previous competitions he competed in is what kept Jones going as a successful powerlifter throughout the years.

"I squatted 400 pounds, deadlifted 462 pounds and benched 319 pounds," he added. "Three judges watch each lift and two of the three must agree the lift was done within proper form guidelines."

The championship Jones just competed in had some sentimental value because it was most likely going to be his last.

"I have accomplished my powerlifting ambitions and would like to move on to new fitness goals," he added.

However, Jones said being around the competitive spirit of the powerlifting community always motivates him to compete again.