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Photo Story - A rare but welcome sight

A 20th Special Operations Squadron CV-22 Osprey makes an approach at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, 11 April, 2018.  The aircraft was on display and open to all personnel on base. The Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing qualities of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. Its mission is to conduct long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces.

A 20th Special Operations Squadron CV-22 Osprey makes an approach at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. The aircraft was on display and open to all personnel on base. The Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing qualities of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. Its mission is to conduct long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zachary Chapman/Released)

The 20th Special Operations Squadron lands a CV-22 Osprey at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, 11 April, 2018. The 20th 20 SOS and the 56th Special Operations Intelligence Squadron personnel were available afterward to speak with Goodfellow trainees about the aircraft and how their commands support America's strategic goals. This versatile, self-deployable aircraft offers increased speed and range over other rotary-wing aircraft, enabling Air Force Special Operations Command aircrews to execute long-range special operations missions.

The 20th Special Operations Squadron lands a CV-22 Osprey at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. The 20th 20 SOS and the 56th Special Operations Intelligence Squadron personnel were available afterward to speak with Goodfellow trainees about the aircraft and how their commands support America's strategic goals. This versatile, self-deployable aircraft offers increased speed and range over other rotary-wing aircraft, enabling Air Force Special Operations Command aircrews to execute long-range special operations missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zachary Chapman/Released)

A 20th Special Operations Squadron CV-22 Osprey lands on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, 11 April, 2018.  The aircraft was on display and open to all personnel on base. The CV-22 is the Special Operation Forces variant of the U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey. The first two test aircraft were delivered to Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., in September 2000. The 58th Special Operations Wing at Kirtland AFB, N.M., began CV-22 aircrew training with the first two production aircraft in August 2006.

A 20th Special Operations Squadron CV-22 Osprey lands on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. The aircraft was on display and open to all personnel on base. The CV-22 is the Special Operation Forces variant of the U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey. The first two test aircraft were delivered to Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., in September 2000. The 58th Special Operations Wing at Kirtland AFB, N.M., began CV-22 aircrew training with the first two production aircraft in August 2006. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zachary Chapman/Released)

A 20th Special Operations Squadron CV-22 Osprey idles after landing at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, 11 April, 2018. The 20th 20 SOS and the 56th Special Operations Intelligence Squadron personnel were on hand to speak with Goodfellow trainees about the aircraft and how their commands support America's strategic goals. The CV-22 is equipped with integrated threat countermeasures, terrain-following radar, forward-looking infrared sensor and other advanced avionics systems that allow it to operate at low altitude in adverse weather conditions and medium- to high-threat environments.

A 20th Special Operations Squadron CV-22 Osprey idles after landing at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. The 20th 20 SOS and the 56th Special Operations Intelligence Squadron personnel were on hand to speak with Goodfellow trainees about the aircraft and how their commands support America's strategic goals. The CV-22 is equipped with integrated threat countermeasures, terrain-following radar, forward-looking infrared sensor and other advanced avionics systems that allow it to operate at low altitude in adverse weather conditions and medium- to high-threat environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zachary Chapman/Released)

A CV-22 Osprey from the 20th Special Operations Squadron rests in a field on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. The Osprey carried members from the 20th SOS as well as the 56th Special Operations Intelligence Squadron, which were on hand to answer questions and provide a tour of the aircraft.

A CV-22 Osprey from the 20th Special Operations Squadron rests in a field on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. The Osprey carried members from the 20th SOS as well as the 56th Special Operations Intelligence Squadron, which were on hand to answer questions and provide a tour of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zachary Chapman/Released)

Airmen line up to tour the CV-22 Osprey from the 20th Special Operations Squadron on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. Goodfellow intelligence trainees were shown what they may work on in the future and also joined a question and answer session as well as other opportunities allowing them to see how they fit into the Air Force’s strategic goals.

Airmen line up to tour the CV-22 Osprey from the 20th Special Operations Squadron on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. Goodfellow intelligence trainees were shown what they may work on in the future and also joined a question and answer session as well as other opportunities allowing them to see how they fit into the Air Force’s strategic goals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zachary Chapman/Released)

A 20th Special Operations Squadron CV-22 Osprey takes off from Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, 11 April, 2018.  The aircraft was on display and open to all personnel on base for a tour and explanation of the aircraft's mission. The first operational CV-22 was delivered to Air Force Special Operations Command in January 2007. Initial operational capability was achieved in 2009. A total of 51 CV-22 aircraft are scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2019.

A 20th Special Operations Squadron CV-22 Osprey takes off from Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. The aircraft was on display and open to all personnel on base for a tour and explanation of the aircraft's mission. The first operational CV-22 was delivered to Air Force Special Operations Command in January 2007. Initial operational capability was achieved in 2009. A total of 51 CV-22 aircraft are scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2019. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zachary Chapman/Released)

Debris is blasted across the field as the CV-22 Osprey from the 20th Special Operations Squadron takes off from Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. The Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing qualities of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. Its mission is to conduct long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces.

Debris is blasted across the field as the CV-22 Osprey from the 20th Special Operations Squadron takes off from Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018. The Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing qualities of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. Its mission is to conduct long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zachary Chapman/Released)

GOODFELLOW AIR FORCE BASE, Texas --

With a flight line that is used for running physical fitness tests it is understandable why many came out to see the CV-22 Osprey land on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, April 11, 2018

 

The Osprey carried members from the 20th Special Operations Squadron as well as the 56th Special Operations Intelligence Squadron, which were on hand to answer questions and provide a tour of the aircraft.

 

Goodfellow intelligence trainees were shown what they may work on in the future and also joined a question and answer session as well as other opportunities allowing them to a see how they fit into the Air Force’s strategic goals.

 

The Osprey is a tilt rotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing qualities of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. Its mission is to conduct long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces.

 

This versatile, self-deployable aircraft offers increased speed and range over other rotary-wing aircraft, enabling Air Force Special Operations Command aircrews to execute long-range special operations missions. The Osprey can perform missions that normally would require both fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft. The Osprey takes off vertically and, once airborne, the nacelles (engine and prop-rotor group) on each wing can rotate into a forward position. 

 

The Osprey is equipped with integrated threat countermeasures, terrain-following radar, forward-looking infrared sensor and other advanced avionics systems that allow it to operate at low altitude in adverse weather conditions and medium- to high-threat environments. 

 

The Osprey is the Special Operation Forces variant of the U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey. The first two test aircraft were delivered to Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., in September 2000. The 58th Special Operations Wing at Kirtland AFB, N.M., began Osprey aircrew training with the first two production aircraft in August 2006. 

 

The first operational Osprey was delivered to Air Force Special Operations Command in January 2007. Initial operational capability was achieved in 2009. A total of 51 Osprey aircraft are scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2019.