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Goodfellow remembers Sept. 11

U.S. Air Force Col. Ricky Mills, 17th Training Wing commander, speaks during the 9/11 remembrance ceremony at the 9/11 memorial near the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts in San Angelo, Texas, Sept. 11, 2018. During his speech, Mills shared about how service members were affected by the attacks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Edwards/Released)

U.S. Air Force Col. Ricky Mills, 17th Training Wing commander, speaks during the 9/11 remembrance ceremony at the 9/11 memorial near the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts in San Angelo, Texas, Sept. 11, 2018. During his speech, Mills shared about how service members were affected by the attacks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Edwards/Released)

A line of firefighting equipment in front of a podium during a 9/11 memorial service at the Louis F. Garland Department of Defense Fire Academy serves as a reminder of those who gave the ultimate sacrifice on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 11, 2018. Goodfellow members came together to remember and honor those who died 17 years ago when answering the call to help. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seraiah Hines/Released)

A line of firefighting equipment in front of a podium during a 9/11 memorial service at the Louis F. Garland Department of Defense Fire Academy serves as a reminder of those who gave the ultimate sacrifice on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 11, 2018. Goodfellow members came together to remember and honor those who died 17 years ago when answering the call to help. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seraiah Hines/Released)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. James Mullenix, 312th Training Squadron instructor, rings a bell five times, three times in a row, to signal the end of watch, according to firefighter tradition in honor of the firefighters who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001 during a 9/11 memorial service at the Louis F. Garland Department of Defense Fire Academy on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Sept. 11, 2018. Before the ringing of the bell, there was a reading of the timeline of events that happened on 9/11. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seraiah Hines/Released)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. James Mullenix, 312th Training Squadron instructor, rings a bell five times, three times in a row, to signal the end of watch, according to firefighter tradition in honor of the firefighters who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001 during a 9/11 memorial service at the Louis F. Garland Department of Defense Fire Academy on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Sept. 11, 2018. Before the ringing of the bell, there was a reading of the timeline of events that happened on 9/11. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seraiah Hines/Released)

Students with the 312th Training Squadron stand in formation at the Louis F. Garland Department of Defense Fire Academy during a 9/11 memorial service on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 11, 2018. The fire academy held the service to honor and remember those who lost their lives during the events of Sept. 11, 2001. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seraiah Hines/Released)

Students with the 312th Training Squadron stand in formation at the Louis F. Garland Department of Defense Fire Academy during a 9/11 memorial service on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 11, 2018. The fire academy held the service to honor and remember those who lost their lives during the events of Sept. 11, 2001. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Seraiah Hines/Released)

Police officers and firefighters stand to be recognized during the 9/11 remembrance ceremony at the 9/11 memorial near the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts in San Angelo, Texas, Sept. 11, 2018. U.S. Air Force Col. Ricky Mills, 17th Training Wing commander, asked them to stand to be recognized because, like 403 first responders that died on Sept. 11, 2001, they are willing to put their lives on the line for others. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Edwards/Released)

Police officers and firefighters stand to be recognized during the 9/11 remembrance ceremony at the 9/11 memorial near the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts in San Angelo, Texas, Sept. 11, 2018. U.S. Air Force Col. Ricky Mills, 17th Training Wing commander, asked them to stand to be recognized because, like 403 first responders that died on Sept. 11, 2001, they are willing to put their lives on the line for others. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Edwards/Released)

A flag containing the names of all the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks rests on an easel at the 9/11 memorial near the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts in San Angelo, Texas, Sept. 11, 2018. San Angelo hosted a 9/11 ceremony to honor the 2,977 victims who died during the attacks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Edwards/Released)

A flag containing the names of all the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks rests on an easel at the 9/11 memorial near the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts in San Angelo, Texas, Sept. 11, 2018. San Angelo hosted a 9/11 ceremony to honor the 2,977 victims who died during the attacks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Edwards/Released)

GOODFELLOW AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- It was a day much like any other. New Yorkers were going about a typical Tuesday morning, then at 8:46 a.m. Sept. 11, 2001, American Airlines Flight 11 crashed into the World Trade Center’s North Tower filling the city skyline with smoke.

At 9:03 a.m., the city was stunned again when United Airlines Flight 175 struck the South Tower. The Pentagon would be hit a mere 34 minutes later with AA Flight 77. The final plane UA Flight 93 would crash in a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, after the passengers thwarted the terrorists onboard.

The attack claimed the lives of 2,977 victims and injured more than 6,000 others in an event that shook the nation.

Now 17 years later, the day has become a way for communities to bind together and honor the memory of the individuals lost that day.

Col. Ricky Mills, 17th Training Wing commander, spoke at San Angelo’s Sept. 11 remembrance event at the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts.

“There are some moments in our lives when we experience events that are permanently etched into memories,” said Mills. “No matter how much time has passed, we will remember the minute details surrounding those moments in history. The magnitude of those events provides an immediate and undeniable understanding that we are now in a much different world.”

During his speech, Mills shared about some of service members whose lives have been affect by the events on Sept. 11.

“Tech. Sgt. Jason Archer was an Air Force recruiter living in Florida,” he said. “Living near Orlando International Airport he was accustomed to the constant sound of aircraft overhead, but on that day the sky was eerily silent.”

The phones rang constantly as calls from potential recruits jumped three fold overnight. Tragedy struck our nation and the citizen of our nation responded not with fear but with firm resolve and a readiness to serve.”

Contributing to the bonds within the community, the Louis F. Garland Department of Defense Fire Academy also hosted a 9/11 memorial ceremony so they could honor the first responders that fell that day.

“Today we take the time to honor the nearly 3,000 individuals who lost their lives on the 11th of September, 2001,” said U.S. Army Col. Kip Korth, 1st Engineer Brigade commander. “We also remember the heroes of that day to include the first responders. They ran toward danger, not away from it. Their courageous actions saved lives and brought hope in a time of despair.”

During the fire academy event, the 312th Training Squadron, whose primary mission is to train firefighters for the DoD, had students stand by in formation.

“The combination of the speaker’s words of the significance of what the responders did on 9/11 and just knowing that the men and women that were formed up behind us were volunteering to go into that precise thing, it was inspiring,” said Col. Thomas Coakley, 17th Training Group commander.