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Evolution of an intelligence course

U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Katelyn Flanagan, 315th Training Squadron Student, asks Capt. Rick Rebulanan, 17th Training Wing chief of international training, questions after reviewing an assignment at the International Training Center on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Jan. 11, 2019. When an exercise is completed the students are welcome to discuss any of the concepts with in the class or the instructors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Hines/Released)

U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Katelyn Flanagan, 315th Training Squadron student, asks Capt. Rick Rebulanan, 17th Training Wing chief of international training, questions after reviewing an assignment at the International Training Center on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Jan. 11, 2019. When an exercise is completed the students are welcome to discuss any of the concepts with in the class or the instructors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Hines/Released)

U.S. Air Force instructors and students part of the updating of the International Intelligence Applications Course stand in front of a static threat display of an SA-4 "Ganef" missile system. (Courtesy photo)

U.S. Air Force instructors and students part of the updating of the International Intelligence Applications Course stand in front of a static threat display of an SA-4 Ganef missile system. (Courtesy photo)

U.S. Air Force Capt. Ric Rebulanan, 17th Training Wing chief of international training, explains to students how to read maps as a part of the updating of the International Intelligence Applications Officers Course. (Courtesy photo)

U.S. Air Force Capt. Ric Rebulanan, 17th Training Wing chief of international training, explains to students how to read maps as a part of the updating of the International Intelligence Applications Officers Course. (Courtesy photo)

U.S. Air Force Capt. Ric Rebulanan, 17th Training Wing chief of international training, explains to Tech. Sgt. Andrew Lorkrantz, 313th Training Squadron instructor, international training, how to apply the value of the rolled dice into statistics used in a game version of attacking a fictional base during the International Intelligence Applications Officers Course at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Jan. 11, 2019. The IIAOC course has undergone updating to include more interactive techniques for the students. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Hines/Released)

U.S. Air Force Capt. Ric Rebulanan, 17th Training Wing chief of international training, explains to Tech. Sgt. Andrew Lorkrantz, 313th Training Squadron instructor, international training, how to apply the value of the rolled dice into statistics used in a game version of attacking a fictional base during the International Intelligence Applications Officers Course at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Jan. 11, 2019. The IIAOC course has undergone updating to include more interactive techniques for the students. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Hines/Released)

GOODFELLOW AIR FORCE BASE, Texas --

Adaptability is the key to air power. Most people serving in the Air Force have heard this phrase. But what does it mean? How do you adapt something that works? Capt. Ric Rebulanan, 17th Training Wing chief of international training, is adapting by updating the 313th Training Squadron’s International Intelligence Applications Course.

“We were able to go through and really think about how to use active learning in this course,” said Rebulanan. “We took it from a course with 4,601 slides down to 1,340 slides and that allows us more time to have hands-on learning with the concepts we are trying to teach.”

IIAOC or fondly now referred to as ‘IIAOC Evolved’ is an integrated course taught at the unclassified level to both U.S. Air Force members along with members from allied nations.

“Building those partnerships and strengthening the relationships with our allies is a huge priority, not only to our commander here at the wing, but also to the Secretary of Defense,” said Rebulanan. “That is what we are trying to do by making this course more immersive and using active learning techniques, we aren’t just telling them how we do something, we are helping them develop those skills.”

Some people helping test the updated course are individuals waiting to start their own classes.

“I feel like this course would benefit all of the intelligence students waiting to start class,” said 2nd. Lt. Loren Vittore, 315th Training Squadron student. “I have been so thankful to get this exposure to some of the terms and concepts before I have to be truly graded on the information.”

The goal of the update is increase the effectiveness of the course but also make it more enjoyable, explained Rebulanan.

“I want this to be a course that other students and instructors look at and say ‘Wow, I want a course like that’,” said Rebulanan. “By increasing the effectiveness we are helping to make sure that the students retain the material.”

This two-and-a-half month course is structured to help introduce those who have never studied or experienced the intelligence career field. A part of the updating is to try and expand the course so that individuals who do have experience can still learn something new or help those in class who haven’t had that opportunity, Rebulanan expounded.

The International Intelligence Training Center coordinates with the Air Force Security and Assistance Training Squadron. AFSATS is the unit that reaches out to international partners and lets them know what courses are being offered and how many student slots are available.

“Our course is always expanding,” said Rebulanan. “We have new partners and allies attending almost every class session. That is why we are trying to make this the best course we possibly can.”