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New AFSC training at Goodfellow

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Teara Jones, a 315th Training Squadron student, uses a virtual reality system to identify aircraft as they fly past her in the new program designed for the Targeting Course in Brandenburg Hall on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, July 11, 2019. The students were able to try different programs during this portion of their training, each with a different goal to help students with their career field. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Wolf/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Teara Jones, a 315th Training Squadron student, uses a virtual reality system to identify aircraft as they fly past her in the new program designed for the Targeting Course in Brandenburg Hall on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, July 11, 2019. The students were able to try different programs during this portion of their training, each with a different goal to help students with their career field. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Wolf/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Wyatt Koppang, a 315th Training Squadron student, uses the new virtual reality software designed for the targeting career field at Brandenburg Hall on Goodfellow Air Force Base, July 11, 2019. This portion of the course allows students to view not readily accessed munitions while attending their training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Wolf/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Wyatt Koppang, a 315th Training Squadron student, uses the new virtual reality software designed for the targeting career field at Brandenburg Hall on Goodfellow Air Force Base, July 11, 2019. This portion of the course allows students to view not readily accessed munitions while attending their training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Wolf/Released)

The instructors for the new 1N8 Targeting Course stand outside Di Tommaso Hall for a photo on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, July 17, 2019. These instructors helped rewrite the old course to better prepare Airmen for the new career field. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Wolf/Released)

The instructors for the new 1N8 Targeting Course stand outside Di Tommaso Hall for a photo on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, July 17, 2019. These instructors helped rewrite the old course to better prepare Airmen for the new career field. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Wolf/Released)

U.S. Air Force students from the first class of the redesigned course for the Targeting Analyst career field stand for a photo outside Di Tommaso Hall on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, July 17, 2019. This new course is designed to incorporate more hands on training and prepare the Airmen for their first duty station. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Wolf/Released)

U.S. Air Force students from the first class of the redesigned course for the Targeting Analyst career field stand for a photo outside Di Tommaso Hall on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, July 17, 2019. This new course is designed to incorporate more hands on training and prepare the Airmen for their first duty station. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Seraiah Wolf/Released)

GOODFELLOW AIR FORCE BASE, Texas --

Geospatial Intelligence, eyes in the sky. Some of our most critical intelligence comes from keen eyes spotting minuscule details in aerial imagery. It is one of the career fields that has been taught here since the 1950s. 

However, there is a new kid on the block. A new Air Force Specialty Code is being taught here, one that originates from Geospatial Intelligence.

A Targeting Analyst, or a 1N8, will specialize in everything that deals with air-to-ground munitions and some surface-to-surface capabilities. They will be the all-in-one targeting analysts, not just “targeteers.”

The teaching curriculum has been rewritten to address field requirements expanding the once 98-day course to 138 days. Although that may sound lengthy, this increase in technical training will allow airmen to arrive at their first duty station ready to accomplish the mission their base supports.

Also included in the new curriculum is a focus on critical thinking and analytic skills. Students will be expected to utilize concepts learned throughout the course in order to explain their reasoning for a decision while taking the class.

This new training methodology ensures analysts have all required initial certifications out of technical school and are not required to complete more training before being able to apply themselves in the field.

In addition to regular classroom time, individuals are able to tour the schoolhouse to see a variety of inert munition replicas up close. The students are also able to take advantage of new software in augmented and virtual reality, allowing them to experience the size and capabilities of some of the munitions not readily accessed in person. 

The developers of the course are interested to see this career field become its own AFSC, not just a shred out.

“I am super excited for this new Air Force Specialty Code” said Capt. Alicia Delia, 315th flight commander for the new Targeting Analyst course. “This gives us a real seat at the table.”

Over 60 percent of the new course will be hands-on application, allowing targeting analysts to leave Goodfellow more mission-ready and with a more robust and operationally relevant application toolset.   

“The course has undergone a drastic change while keeping core concepts in place,” said Tech. Sgt. Josef Haltom, 315th Training Squadron noncommissioned officer in charge of the Targeting Analyst course. “The change within the course reflects the growing major command’s changes and requirements.”