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Photo Story - CV-22 Osprey lands at Goodfellow

A CV-22 Osprey from Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., prepares to land

A CV-22 Osprey from Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., prepares to land on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 13, 2021. The CV-22 Osprey is a tilt-rotor aircraft that is capable of the take-off, landing and hover qualities of a helicopter with the long-range characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Tyrell Hall)

Goodfellow Air Force Base members tour a CV-22 Osprey

Goodfellow Air Force Base members tour a CV-22 Osprey here, Oct. 13, 2021. The CV-22 is the special operation forces variant of the U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey and is equipped with integrated threat countermeasures, terrain-following radar, forward-looking infrared sensor and other advanced avionics systems. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Tyrell Hall)

Airmen await their turn to view the interior of the CV-22 Osprey

Airmen await their turn to view the interior of the CV-22 Osprey on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 13, 2021. The aircraft landed on Goodfellow after traveling from Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., to provide Goodfellow students with an orientation from personnel they may work with in the field, including direct support operators. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Tyrell Hall)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Brady Gallagher, 20th Special Operations Squadron special missions aviator, briefs Goodfellow students on the various capabilities of the CV-22 Osprey

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Brady Gallagher, 20th Special Operations Squadron special missions aviator, briefs Goodfellow students on the various capabilities of the CV-22 Osprey at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 13, 2021. The aircraft is capable of higher speed and range over rotary-wing aircraft and it can perform missions that would require a combination of fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Tyrell Hall)

Students from Goodfellow Air Force Base tour a CV-22 Osprey

Students from Goodfellow Air Force Base tour a CV-22 Osprey here, Oct. 13, 2021. Goodfellow intelligence trainees interacted with personnel they may work with in the field including direct support operators. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Tyrell Hall)

U.S. Air Force Capt. Seth Smith, 20th Special Operations Squadron aircraft commander, talks to a Goodfellow member about the instruments located in the cockpit of a CV-22 Osprey

U.S. Air Force Capt. Seth Smith, 20th Special Operations Squadron aircraft commander, talks to a Goodfellow member about the instruments located in the cockpit of a CV-22 Osprey at Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 13, 2021. The Osprey is designed to support long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Tyrell Hall)

GOODFELLOW AIR FORCE BASE, Texas --

Goodfellow Airmen gathered to experience a CV-22 Osprey from Cannon AFB, N.M., landed here, Oct. 13, 2021.

The Osprey carried members from the 20th Special Operations Squadron, 56th Special Operations Intelligence Squadron and 43rd Intel Squadron who answered questions for those in attendance and provided a tour of the aircraft.

Goodfellow intelligence trainees interacted with personnel they may work with in the field including direct support operators. These individuals are airborne linguist assigned as Osprey aircrew who provide threat warnings. Students also participated in a Q&A session and other opportunities allowing them to understand their role in the Air Force’s strategic mission.

According to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, the CV-22 is the special operation forces variant of the U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey. It is a tilt-rotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, landing and hover qualities of a helicopter with the long-range characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. It is designed to conduct long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces.

The aircraft is capable of higher speed and range over rotary-wing aircraft and it can perform missions that would require a combination of fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft. The aircraft takes off vertically, and once airborne, the propellers on each wing can rotate into a forward position.

The CV-22 is equipped with integrated threat countermeasures, terrain-following radar, forward-looking infrared sensor and other advanced avionics systems. This allows it to operate at low altitudes in adverse weather conditions and medium- to high-threat environments.